Is Being Competitive More Important Than Winning?

Business Sales Executive Omar Rashid always has one eye on the prize. In his first BrightHR blog post he talks about his competitive nature, and asks the question, Is being competitive more important than winning?

Omar Rashid: BrightHR Business Sales Executive

A lot of people say, and also believe, that winning is all that matters and that is fine by me. I personally always play to win. I really enjoy it, and I hate losing. I can also assert that I don’t enjoy winning by a distance, or winning easily. There are exceptions of course, for instance when your opponent is someone you dislike or is overly cocky. Winning easily, in my eyes can be a bit of a curse, and one that can make you lazy - especially in the long run. The one thing I honestly love though is competing.

When we are in a competitive situation we learn new things about ourselves. If we are facing a competitor with a higher level of skill, but the same amount of determination to win then we have two options:

1. To improve ourselves and attain the skill level required
Or
2. To lose

The infamous quote from the fundamentals of chess 1883 says it best:

The only way to get smarter is to play a smarter opponent

For those of you wondering, yes I did get lift this quote from the movie Revolver. However, as a seriously competitive man, I must reset my focus to say this: when we compete with opponents that are as good as, or better than us it forces us to adapt and improve our own game and to learn new things. Close competition can give us a buzz and surge of adrenaline that winning easily cannot give.

When we win without competing, bad habits can start to set in. The opponent is not pushing us to our limits meaning our skill level will be reduced. It is human nature to sometimes push ourselves only as much as we need to, therefore if we do not have an external source testing us and we become lesser versions of ourselves.

Chelsea football team are a good example of this; they won the Premier League easily last season. This season, and also towards the end of last season, you can see how their motivation and skill levels have dropped. Human nature and the nature of competition are heavily intertwined. As a result of this truism no sector of the universe is safe — and that goes for business too.

Major corporations such as Samsung and Apple exist in the same spirit of competition as Pepsi and Coke always have done. Supremacy amongst these technological giants looms large as they compete to become the number one real thing within the mobile device marketplace, and we all wonder which one to choose. This level of competition drives both Apple and Samsung to work better, faster and more intelligently. It highlights one salient point: if we had one corporation winning these battles easily would we be where we are in terms of advancement in technology? When we consider the 3D printer the answer is clearly and joyfully no. It is also why BrightHR have been positioned to develop a new breed of absence management technology — that is highly engaging, customisable and socially focussed. There is no other brand like it within the SaaS marketplace.

Our product and our internal culture are driven towards competition and play, and because of this we are thriving. We will continue to compete, win and develop our service and we hope to attract some worthy opponents.

We’re ready!